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Archive for October, 2020

Life in COVID-19: Managing Asthma

Friday, October 9, 2020 @ 07:10 AM  posted by jbuytaert

Courtesy of the American Association for Respiratory Care – Oct 8, 2020

COVID-19 has taken the world by storm and it doesn’t seem to be leaving anytime soon. So, as  the coming months bring winter and cool crisp weather, you as a respiratory therapist may begin to worry about your patients living with asthma. With no vaccine for COVID-19 and asthma triggering weather on the horizon, it is important to make sure your patients are extra careful this winter season.

That’s why we asked for some help from AARC member Joyce Baker, RRT, RRT-NPS, AE-C, who currently serves as the asthma clinical program coordinator for Children’s Hospital Colorado. The following is a list of frequently asked questions regarding asthma and COVID-19 compiled by Joyce. Read them over and share them with your asthma patients—

Asthma – COVID-19 FAQ

Q: Is asthma “at risk” for COVID-19?

A: People with asthma are more likely to be hospitalized than someone without asthma, mostly because viral illnesses can trigger asthma exacerbations. We cannot say whether asthma attacks from COVID-19 are any different than asthma attacks from any other viral infection. Good ways to decrease risk of an asthma attack from a viral illness is to:

  • Take daily controller medications.
  • Take inhaled corticosteroid medication, which MAY decrease susceptibility of infection
  • Make sure asthma medications are refilled.
  • Call your health care provider if the quick reliever does not resolve asthma symptoms.

Q: Should a child with asthma return to in person classrooms?

A: The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) released guidelines saying that it “strongly advocates” the goal of having students “physically present in school.” The AAP based their recommendations on the following emerging evidence:

  • Children are much less likely than adults to get very sick from the virus. Children 10 years old and younger are also less likely to transmit the virus to others.
  • No more risk than flu season.
  • School closures resulted in significant ‘harms’ to children. These harms included a lack of socialization, learning deficits, a decreased ability for schools to monitor problems like depression and abuse, and less access for students to physical activity and to affordable or free food.
  • If a family chooses not to have a child return to in person classroom it is important to respect this decision.

Q: Are there different precautions for a person with asthma who is returning to in person classroom or work?

A: No, people with asthma can return to an in-person classroom or work. All children two and older should wear a mask to prevent the spread, there is no exemption for asthma. Read more

Proven way to disinfect N95 masks!

Thursday, October 1, 2020 @ 09:10 AM  posted by jbuytaert