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Thursday, March 8, 2018 @ 10:03 AM  posted by jbuytaert

Enriching Lives: Mollie King and Olivia Peterson

Wednesday, March 7, 2018 @ 09:03 AM  posted by jbuytaert

Last week we had a customer fall outside and he was scuffed up a bit. When this happened, the front desk team of Olivia Peterson and Mollie King jumped into action to help him. They went outside to make sure that he was okay and learned that an ambulance was already called to assist. While waiting for the ambulance, the customer mentioned that he was worried about being able to pick up his order as he fell shortly before 5 pm and knew that we were about to close. The team reassured him that they would make sure he received his order since they were in charge of closing the front doors anyways.

As the paramedics arrived, Mollie – who had already gone into the will call room and picked up his order – was poised and ready to deliver his order. The paramedics brought him into our showroom so the customer could call someone to pick him up and take him to the hospital to be examined further. Unfortunately, he was not able to find anyone timely to pick him up so Olivia gave the customer a ride to the hospital on her way home with his order in hand.

These actions show the true spirit of enriching lives. The customer even mentioned to Olivia on the ride that he would be a Handi customer for life – then jokingly added he probably would have been anyway, but now for sure. There are many times when our customers are not feeling well or have even had an accident such as this. This was an opportunity for our team to shine and enrich this customer’s life by going above and beyond the call of duty and they did not hesitate to do just that. Great work team!

Can’t Sleep? These potted plants in your bedroom may help

Wednesday, March 7, 2018 @ 08:03 AM  posted by jbuytaert

by Claire R. McIntosh, AARP, November 16, 2017|

Kara Riley/Stocksy

Houseplants help remove toxins, impart a feeling of calm and promote drowsiness when used in the bedroom.

Insomnia? Allergies? Asthma? Stress? Let’s clear the air, shall we? We’ve seen the science, so here’s the secret: You’ll rest easier with potted plants in your bedroom. There are studies by NASA, which has extensively researched how plants remove VOCs (volatile organic compounds such as formaldehyde and benzene) from a space station.

There’s research done by a Japanese company to design gardens that clean the air in hospitals. And then there’s that nerdy kid who sealed cat poop into one container with plants, and moldy bread into another container with plants.

He found that, relative to control containers that had the yucky stuff but not the plants, airborne contaminants were greatly reduced hours later. We wouldn’t bother mention his study but his coauthor was a nurse practitioner who worked in dad’s allergy clinic, and the physician later shared the results with colleagues at the annual meeting of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

Not only do certain houseplants help remove toxins, impart a feeling of calm and promote drowsiness, they’re also a Pinterest-pretty way to boost your boudoir style! Don’t you just love how the hanging plants, macramé and rattan planters and glass terrariums we all had in our first apartments are currently trending on Etsy? Cultivate these horticultural hacks and you can rest easy.

JASMINE

Researchers in Germany tested the scent of jasmine on lab mice and watched them curl up in a corner and chill. The plant affects the same key neurotransmitter that makes us mellow out after a dose of valium — and was found to be just as potent as psychotropic drugs in a clinical setting. Jasmine fragrance produces the molecular mechanism also triggered by barbiturates to soothe, ease anxiety and promote sleep. Even better, let the fragrance of a potted jasmine waft through your bedroom tonight and you may avoid tomorrow’s afternoon slump.

VALERIAN

You’ve heard of swallowing this as a supplement or tea for restful sleep. Well, some Japanese neuroscientists learned that sniffing it helps too. While valerian is generally cultivated outside, follow these tips for green-thumbing it indoors.

ENGLISH IVY

Remember the kid, the moldy bread and the cat poop? Mold and pet feces are common household allergens, and English ivy is what cleared the air. Who can sleep when you’re sneezin’ and wheezin’? NASA scientists give it the nod, too. So if you want to nod off, let some English ivy trail down your nightstand.

GARDENIA

Five sleep researchers in Osaka. Twenty-one tossing and turning men. Six weeks. One compound derived from gardenias. Countless Zzzzzzzs. Zero side effects. You know what we love? This bedside-table perfect bonsai version from Harry and David.

LAVENDER

Of course, you knew this, because your mother kept lavender sachets in the drawer with her nightgowns. You want to sleep like a baby? Think lavender bouquet by the bed, essential oil on your pillow or added to your bedtime bath. Moms who bathed their babies in lavender smiled more, were less stressed and touched their babies more in the bath. The babies cried less, made more eye contact and had longer periods of deep sleep. Cortisol levels dropped in both moms and infants. Yes, please!

ALOE VERA

It vacuums up those VOCs while you catch your Zzzzs, say NASA scientists.

BOSTON FERN

Remember back in the ’80s when yuppie watering holes were called “fern bars” because of this ubiquitous decoration? Turns out, this plant drinks up formaldehyde from the air. Here’s to your health.

SNAKE PLANT (MOTHER-IN-LAW’S TONGUE)

No green thumb? If you can’t keep this easy-care plant alive, you might as well give up and buy an air purifier.

CMS DISREGARDS O2 REQUIREMENTS UNDER EXERTION

Wednesday, February 28, 2018 @ 02:02 PM  posted by jbuytaert

2/28/2018
From: MiraVista

In its recent Quarterly HCPCS Update, CMS instituted changes to oxygen pricing modifiers related to volume adjustment. These changes will impose further rate reductions and likely cause harm to patients and DME suppliers alike.

In a December 7, 1992 Interim Final Rule, CMS found that Section 1834 of the Social Security Act is silent regarding volume adjustments when the prescribed oxygen liter flow varies according to the circumstances of the patient. As a result, CMS added the following regulatory language regarding volume adjustments:

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​Although this guidance has been on the books for over two decades, the change in pricing modifiers, effective April 1, 2018, will shift the physician education burden to suppliers.

Here’s what you need to know about the change:

Providers currently use three pricing modifiers for oxygen volume adjustments, based on the highest liter flow prescribed (regardless of modality): Continue Reading…

Case Study Involving Compression Fitting for Burn Patients

Tuesday, February 27, 2018 @ 11:02 AM  posted by jbuytaert

A special acknowledgement to Nancy Petrun, Handi Medical’s Custom Compression Specialist for her work in this project.
All of the patients involved are ones that Nancy worked with to get them their compression garments.